The M-Band

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Figure 1. Each plasma cell produces a different type of antibody. Normal γ globin band is depicted in the left column. The plasma cell numbers are normal and each produces an antibody with a different amino acid structure and electrophoretic mobility. Patients with monoclonal gammopathy have expansion (increase number) of a plasma cell clone (red in the diagram) resulting in the production of a disproportionate large amount of immunoglobulin from one type of plasma cell. This results in the M Band (see below). Patients with polyclonal gammopathy have an expansion (increased number) of plasma cells. This is usually occurs in response to infection/inflammation that result in production of a diversity of antibodies. The diversity is reflected in increase in the γ but as no one clone dominates the sharp M band is not seen.

What is an M-Band?

Immunoglobulins are antigen binding molecules secreted by plasma cells. Immunoglobulins bind antigens and play a role acquired immunity. Plasma cells develop from antigen exposed B-lymphocytes. The process of maturation of lymphocytes involves inducing mutations in region of the immunoglobulin gene that encodes for antigen binding regions, the hypervariable regions. This makes the DNA and consequently the amino acid sequence of the immunoglobulin secereted by a plasma cell unique. This is true even when two plasma cells make antibody against the same antigen or antigenic epitope (see figure 1).

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Figure 2. The serum protein separate into many bands on electrophoresis. The albumin is a dark band closest to the anode. This is followed by the α1, α2, β and γ bands. The immunoglobulin are mainly found in the γ globulin band but some may be found in the β globin band. The electrophoretic mobility of a molecule depends on the charge it carries which in turn depends on the amino acid sequence. Amino acid sequence determines the antigen specificity and differs between antibodies resulting in a slight variation in electrophoretic mobility of immunoglobulins and resulting in the γ region being a broad band.


The amino acid sequence determines the charge on the immunoglobulin. The electrophoretic mobility is determined by the charge. Majority of the immunoglobulins move to the γ-globulin fraction of serum proteins, some move with β-globulin. The γ-globulin band is a wide electrophoretic band reflecting the diversity in electrophoretic mobility of immunoglobulins arising from the diversity in amino acid sequences (figure 2).

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Figure 3. Patinets of monoclonal gammopathies have an expansion of one clone of plasma cells. This reflects in production of a disproportionally large amount of immunoglobulin with identical electrophoretic mobility resulting in a dense band with in γ globin region


Patients of monoclonal gammopathies have clonal expansion of plasma cells. The cells of a clone have identical DNA and produce identical immunoglobulin molecules. When the clone grows to level that it forms a significant proportion of the plasma cell pool the immunoglobulin it produces forms a significant proportion of the total serum immunoglobulins. The identical electrophoretic mobility of molecules produced by the clone results in a disproportionately large number of immunoglobulin concentrating to a point on electrophoresis forming a band.  This is known as the M band.  Lymphoma cells, notably those of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, can secrete immunoglobulin and are associated with an M band for similar reasons.

Diseases associated with an M-Band

The M-Band is a serum marker for plasma cell dycrasias and Waldenström macroglobulinemia. IgM and non-IgM (mainly IgG and IgA) monoclonal bands have differing clinical implications. The former is more commonly associated with lymphoproliferative disease and the latter with plasma cell dycrasias. The presence of an M band only indicates a clonal expansion of immunoglobulin producing cells. It does not indicate malignancy. The diagnosis of malignancy is made by features that suggest end organ damage. The absence of end organ damage indicates a premalignant disease including monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS), soldering multiple myeloma or smoldering Waldenström macroglobulinemia.  The evidence of end-organ damage includes

  1. non-IgM Monoclonal Gammoathies: CRAB (elevated calcium, renal involvement, anaemia and osteolytic (bone) lesions) creatinine,
  2. IgM Monoclonal Gammapathies: Anemia, constitutional symptoms, hyperviscosity, lymphadenopathy, or hepatosplenomegaly that can be attributed to the underlying lymphoproliferative disorder if diagnosis is Waldenström macroglobulinemia or CRAB (elevated calcium, renal involvement, anaemia and osteolytic (bone) lesions) creatinine if the diagnosis of IgM myeloma

False positive M-Band

The presence of M band indicates presence of a clonal expansion of plasma cells. When end organ damage co-exists with M band a diagnosis of a malignancy (multiple myeloma or Waldenström macroglobulinemia) is made. In the absence of end organ damage the diagnosis of a premalignant disease is made. Proliferation a of plasma cells are seen in infections/inflammation. These are polyclonal and result in s polyclonal gammopath. They do not result in the presence of an M-band.

 

 

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2 Comments

    1. M band indicates a monoclonal gammopathy that be a low risk premalignant entity like monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS), a high risk premalignant condition like smouldering multiple or a frank malignancy like multiple myeloma. The answer to your question depends on the cause of M band that can only be diagnosed by the presence of myeloma defining events

      Reply

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